Archery Tips

Draw Length

Answer: I see so many archers shooting a bow with an improper bow length. Usually too long!
An easy way to check for proper draw length is in front of a mirror. Bring your bow back to full draw. You should look like a perfect T, with your shoulders parallel to the ground and your eyes directly over your belt buckle.
If your head is leaning back, or your bow arm shoulder is higher than your release arm shoulder, then your draw length is TOO long.
If your hips are thrust forward, your draw length is TOO long.
If your bow arm shoulder is lower than your release arm shoulder, or your bow arm is bent too much, then your draw length is TOO short.
The string should be touching the tip of your nose.
If the string is behind or along the side of your nose, your draw length is TOO long.
If the string is in front of your nose, then your draw length is TOO short.
Many archers are in denial about their draw length. Most everyone thinks they are bigger (longer) than they actually are.
Remember, having the proper draw length will enable you to hold the bow steadier and shoot better.

How do I grip the bow?

Answer: This is a common question I hear all of the time and the answer is very simple.
Lean on a metal post with your bow hand. There it is. That is the hand position you should have on our bow.
You should NOT lock your elbow on your bow arm. It should be slightly bent. Too many archers shoot with a locked elbow or their bow arm bent too much. Bring your bow to full draw, lock your elbow, and then relax your elbow. That is the proper position for your bow arm.

What is a proper anchor point?

Answer: At full draw, the bowstring should be touching the tip of your nose and just slightly touching the side of your face.
To be more consistent in your shooting, you should try to find as many reference points as possible.
Centering your scope or pin in your peep sight is a reference point.
If you’re a finger shooter, a finger at the corner of your mouth, your jawbone, or a thumb underneath your jaw bone are reference points.
If you shoot a release, placing your jawbone or cheek on a knuckle or between knuckles are reference points. You will usually find a combination of spots with you hand, finger(s), knuckle(s), jawbone and cheekbone.
Remember, the more reference points you find, the more consistent you will shoot.

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